RCMI Specilized Centers

Program Description

The purpose of the RCMI Specialized Centers program is to expand the national capacity for research in the health sciences by providing cooperative agreement support to institutions that offer doctoral degrees in the health professions or in a health-related science and have a historical and current commitment to educating underrepresented students, and for institutions that deliver healthcare services, providing clinical services to medically underserved communities.

Goals

  • Enhance institutional research capacity within the areas of basic biomedical, behavioral, and/or clinical research
  • Enable all levels of investigators to become more successful in obtaining competitive extramural support, especially from NIH, particularly for research on diseases that disproportionately impact minority and other health disparity populations
  • Foster environments conducive to career enhancement with a special emphasis on development of new and early career investigators
  • Enhance the quality of all scientific inquiry and promote research on minority health and health disparities
  • Establish sustainable relationships with community-based organizations that will partner with the RCMI institution

Eligibility

The RCMI Specialized Centers program supports projects at domestic public and private institutions of higher education located in the United States and its territories which:

  • Have received an average of less than $50 million per year of NIH support for the past three fiscal years;
  • Award doctoral degrees in the health professions or the sciences related to health;
  • Have a historical and current mission to educate students from any of the populations that have been identified as underrepresented in biomedical research as defined by the National Science Foundation (NSF), see http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/ (i.e., African Americans or Blacks, Hispanic or Latino Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, and persons with disabilities); and
  • Have a documented track record of: (1) recruiting, training and/or educating, and graduating underrepresented students as defined by NSF (see above), which has resulted in increasing the institution's contribution to the national pool of graduates from underrepresented backgrounds who pursue biomedical research careers and, (2) for institutions that deliver healthcare services, providing clinical services to medically underserved communities.